Teotihuacan, the Largest Prehistoric City in the Americas.
A Photo Gallery
The Cannibalism Paradigm: Assessing Contact Period Ethnohistorical Discourse
Teotihuacan Mural Art: Assessing the Accuracy
of its Interpretation
Mesoamerican Archaeoastronomy: Contemporary Understandings of Prehispanic Astronomic Knowledge

The Pyramid of the Sun is the largest of an immense array of pyramids in the Valley of Mexico, northeast of present-day Mexico City. This view is the westward side as seen from the ancient city's central avenue, seen below.

Piramide del Sol — Pyramid of the Sun — Teotihuacan, Mexico
Piramide del Sol — Pyramid of the Sun — Teotihuacan, Mexico

Click images for larger views.

Avenida de los Muertos — Avenue of the Dead — Teotihuacán, Mexico
Avenida de los Muertos — Avenue of the Dead — Teotihuacán, Mexico

Teotihuacán's central avenue, the so-called 'Avenue of the Dead,' extends southward from the Pyramid of the Moon for four kilometers, past the Pyramid of the Sun and the entrance of the Ciudela. The Quetzalcoatl Pyramid, seen below, is located in the center of the Ciudela.
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stepped front facade of the Quetzalcoatl Pyramid

This view of the stepped front facade of the Quetzalcoatl Pyramid illustrates the elements of the repeating design.

Feathered Serpent and Tlaloc masks project from the facade of the Quetzalcoatl Pyramid.

Feathered Serpent and Tlaloc masks project from the facade of the Quetzalcoatl Pyramid.

Quetzalcoatl Pyramid facade partially recreated in the National Museum of Anthropology, Mexico City.

The Quetzalcoatl Pyramid facade has been partially recreated in the National Museum of Anthropology in Mexico City. Trace amounts of the original paints allowed for a full color recreation.

An immense monolithic statue of Chalchiuhtlicue from Teotihuacan is housed in the Teotihuacan gallery of the Museum of Anthropology, Mexico City.

An immense monolithic statue of Chalchiuhtlicue from Teotihuacan is housed in the Teotihuacan gallery of the Museum of Anthropology, Mexico City.

Most surfaces of the multitude of pyramid facades at Teotihuacan were painted with bright colors.
Vivid fresco murals also decorated the interiors of buildings. Several are recreated in the museum.

Vivid fresco murals decorated the interiors of Teotihuacan buildings.
On the same level and a few feet away are found well preserved murals of eagles and jaguars.
Teotihuacan mural of jaguars.

An excavated substructure near the Pyramid of the Moon, Teotihuacan.Excavations at Teotihuacan have revealed that older structures were infilled and built upon with newer buildings. This view is of an excavated substructure near the Pyramid of the Moon.

Many areas of the city center have several layers of ruins, preserving an older era of building below successive construction.

An ancient wheeled toy in the Museum of Anthropology, Mexico City. A wheeled toy.
Art, iconography, and symbolism is vividly displayed in murals at Teotihuacan.
The interpretation of the art, iconography and symbolism at Teotihuacan has remained elusive, or, where proposed, often there are conflicting interpretations.

Tepantila mural recreation.
Vivid fresco murals decorated the interiors of Teotihuacan buildings.

Teotihuacan Mural Art: Assessing the Accuracy of its Interpretation

Teotihuacan map, Piramid of the Sun, Pyramid of the Moon, Ciudadela.

The Dresden Codex Lunar Series and Sidereal Astronomy

Assessing Evidence of Geospatial Intelligence in the Americas

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" 11 Ahau was the katun when they carried on their backs. Then the land-surveyor first came; this was Ah Ppizte who measured the leagues. Then there came the chacté shrub for marking the leagues with their walking sticks. Then he came Uac-hab-nal to pull the weeds along the leagues, when Mizcit Ahau came to sweep clean the leagues, when the land-surveyor came. These were long leagues that he measured. ..."

"... the great mounds came to be built by the lineages and all the things which the rulers did. They were the ones who built the mounds. It took thirteen katuns and six years for them to construct them. The following was the beginning of the mounds they built. Fifteen four-hundreds were the scores of their mounds, and fifty more made the total count of the mounds they constructed all over the land. "

THE BOOK OF CHILAM BALAM OF CHUMAYEL, Ralph L. Roys, 1933, Carnegie Institution Washington D.C.


Early Monumental Architecture
of the Peruvian Coast
Chavin and the Origins
of Andean Civilization
Tupac Amaru, the Life, Times,
and Execution of the Last Inca
Mound Builders of the Eastern Woodlands

Earthworks Photo Galleries
Mound Builders of the Eastern Woodlands


Ancient Monuments Placemarks

Caral  |  Casma  |  Cahokia


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